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Molecular Microbiology & Immunology

The Graduate Program in Molecular Microbiology and Immunology provides a stimulating environment for our graduate students who will play a leadership role in academic, government and industrial research and in international health organizations. Advances in molecular and cell biology and genetics have opened new approaches to the study of basic and applied aspects of infectious disease and host defense. We are applying these approaches to studies of microbial pathogenesis, immune cell function, inflammation, receptor signaling, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene regulation, genetic manipulation of cell functions,tumor immunology and immunotherapy and vaccine development. Techniques including functional genomics, gene delivery, and derivation of transgenic animals are being developed and utilized to address specific questions. Our program provides interactive, multifaceted education and research training. Our graduates receive comprehensive education in molecular and cell biology, microbiology and immunology and in-depth training in their chosen area of research.

Our Ph.D. and M.D./Ph.D. students train in the laboratories of participating faculty in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Institute of Human Virology, Greenebaum Cancer Center, Center for Vaccine Development, Institute for Genome Science, the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis in the Dental School and the Institute of Marine & Environmental Technology . As part of the Graduate Program in Life Sciences at UMB, interaction between other graduate programs and departments facilitates broadening of the research experience and of graduate student life.

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Research Spotlight:

UM SOM Researchers Unravel Mechanism That Plays Key Role in Sexual Differentiation of Brain

McCarthyDuring prenatal development, the brains of most animals, including humans, develop specifically male or female characteristics. In most species, some portions of male and female brains are a different size, and often have a different number of neurons and synapses. However, scientists have known little about the details of how this differentiation occurs. Now, a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) has illuminated some details about how this occurs.‌


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