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Graduate Program In Life Sciences (GPILS)

The Graduate Program in Life Sciences (GPILS) offers cutting edge research training in basic, biomedical, clinical and population sciences. We offer seven Ph.D. granting graduate programs and four M.S. level programs.

Our graduate programs cover the entire range of biomedical research, from the basics of protein structure and molecular biology, through integrative systems physiology, virology and vaccine development up to behavior, cognition, population based genetics, and the impact of the environment on human health. Our programs place a special emphasis on the importance of translational research.

Student Profiles

Faculty Profiles

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Events

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department Seminar

Monday, December 11th, 2017
4:00 pm
BRF 102
Host: Dr. Wilson
Aaron T. Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry - UMBC
TBA

Frontiers in Vaccinology Lectureship, Center for Vaccine Development

Tuesday, December 12, 2017
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Leadership Hall, MSTF
Dr Peter Hotez, "Vaccines, Autism, and Blue Marble Health"
Reception to follow at 2:00 pm in MSTF Atrium

Molecular Microbiology and Immunology Department Seminar

Wednesday, December 13th, 2017
4:00 pm
HSFII Auditorium
Host: Dr. Flajnik
Meghan O'Donoghue Altman, PhD
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/NIH
"Hemagglutinin may serve as an immunocomputer running influenza's pandemic program"

Current News

Student Publications

Student Awards & Honors


Contact Us

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Graduate Program in Life Sciences
655 W. Baltimore Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Email: GPILS-Info@som.umaryland.edu

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How To Apply


Alumni Highlights



Research Spotlight:

UM SOM Researchers Unravel Mechanism That Plays Key Role in Sexual Differentiation of Brain

McCarthyDuring prenatal development, the brains of most animals, including humans, develop specifically male or female characteristics. In most species, some portions of male and female brains are a different size, and often have a different number of neurons and synapses. However, scientists have known little about the details of how this differentiation occurs. Now, a new study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) has illuminated some details about how this occurs.‌


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GPILS News and Events Submission Forms

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